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Chemical and Biological Engineering


2014-2015

Program Description

The Chemical and Biological Engineering Department offers two different degrees:

  • Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and
  • Bachelor of Science in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering.

Generally, the fields of chemical and biochemical engineering are extremely broad, and encompass all technologies and industries where chemical processing is utilized in any form. Students with baccalaureate (BS) Chemical Engineering or Chemical and Biochemical Engineering degrees from CSM can find employment in many diverse fields, including: advanced materials synthesis and processing, product and process research and development, food and pharmaceutical processing and synthesis, biochemical and biomedical materials and products, microelectronics manufacturing, petroleum and petrochemical processing, and process and product design. A student seeking the degree of BS in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering graduates as a fully-qualified Chemical Engineer with additional training in bioprocessing technologies that are of interest in renewable energy and other emerging fields.

The practice of chemical engineering draws from the fundamentals of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Accordingly, undergraduate students must initially complete a program of study that stresses these basic fields of science. Chemical engineering coursework blends these four disciplines into a series of engineering fundamentals relating to how materials are produced and processed both in the laboratory and in large industrial-scale facilities. Courses such as fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and chemical process control are at the heart of the chemical engineering curriculum at CSM. In addition, it is becoming increasingly important for engineers to understand how biological and microscopic, molecular-level properties can influence the macroscopic behavior of materials, biological, and chemical systems. This somewhat unique focus is first introduced at CSM through the physical and organic chemistry sequences, and the theme is continued and developed within the chemical engineering curriculum via material and projects introduced in advanced courses. Our undergraduate program at CSM is exemplified by intensive integration of computer-aided simulation and computer-aided process modeling in the curriculum and by our unique approach to teaching of the unit operations laboratory sequence. The unit operations lab course is offered only in the summer as a 6-week intensive session. Here, the fundamentals of heat, mass, and momentum transfer and applied thermodynamics are reviewed in a practical, applications-oriented setting. The important skills of teamwork, critical thinking, time management, and oral and written technical communications skills are also stressed in this course.

Facilities for the study of chemical engineering or chemical and biochemical engineering at the Colorado School of Mines are among the best in the nation. Our modern in-house computer laboratory supports nearly 70 workstations for students to use in completing their assigned coursework. In addition, specialized undergraduate laboratory facilities exist for studying polymer properties, measuring reaction kinetics, characterizing transport phenomena, and for studying several typical chemical unit operations. Our honors undergraduate research program is open to highly qualified students and provides our undergraduates with the opportunity to carry out independent research or to join a graduate research team. This program has been highly successful and our undergraduate chemical engineering and chemical and biochemical engineering students have won several national competitions and awards based on research conducted while pursuing their baccalaureate degrees. We also have a cooperative (Co-Op) education program in which students can earn course credit while gaining work experience in industry.

Programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering are both accredited by:

The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
telephone (410) 347-7700

Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department at CSM has established 3 program educational objectives for all of its graduates and one additional objective specifically for its Chemical and Biochemical Engineering graduates. Our graduates within 3 to 5 years of completing their degree will:

  • be in graduate school or in the workforce utilizing their education in chemical engineering fundamentals
  • be applying their knowledge of and skills in engineering fundamentals in conventional areas of chemical engineering and in contemporary and growing fields
  • have demonstrated both their commitment to continuing to develop personally and professionally and an appreciation for the ethical and social responsibilities associated with being an engineer and a world citizen

Additionally, our Chemical and Biochemical Engineering graduates within 3 to 5 years of completing their degree will be applying their knowledge of and skills in biochemical engineering fundamentals.

Combined Baccalaureate/Masters Degree Program

The Chemical and Biological Engineering Department offers the opportunity to begin work on a Master of Science (with or without thesis) degree while completing the requirements of the BS degree. These combined BS/MS degrees are designed to allow undergraduates engaged in research, or simply interested in furthering their studies beyond a BS degree, to apply their experience and interest to an advanced degree. Students may take graduate courses while completing their undergraduate degrees and count them towards their graduate degree. The requirements for the MS degree consist of the four core graduate courses:

CBEN509ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS3.0
CBEN516TRANSPORT PHENOMENA3.0
CBEN518REACTION KINETICS AND CATALYSIS3.0
CBEN568INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH3.0
Additional credits18.0
Total Hours30.0

It is expected that a student would be able to complete both degrees in 5 to 5 1/2 years. To take advantage of the combined program, students are encouraged to engage in research and take some graduate coursework during their senior year. The application process and requirements are identical to our normal MS degree programs. Applications may be completed online and require 3 letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and completion of the graduate record exam (GRE). For students who intend to begin the BS/MS program in Fall, applications are due by April 1st. The deadline is November 1st for students intending to enroll in the Spring semester. Students must have a GPA greater than 3.0 to be considered for the program. Interested students are encouraged to get more information from their advisor and/or the current faculty member in charge of Graduate Affairs.

Curriculum

The Chemical Engineering and Chemical and Biochemical Engineering curricula are structured according to the goals outlined above. Accordingly, the programs of study are organized to include 3 semesters of science and general engineering fundamentals followed by 5 semesters of chemical/biochemical engineering fundamentals and applications.

A. Chemical/Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals

The following courses represent the basic knowledge component of the Chemical Engineering curriculum at CSM.

CBEN201MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES3.0
CBEN307FLUID MECHANICS3.0
CBEN308HEAT TRANSFER3.0
CBEN357CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS3.0
CBEN375MASS TRANSFER3.0
CBEN430TRANSPORT PHENOMENA3.0

B. Chemical/Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Applications

The following courses are applications-oriented courses that build on the student’s basic knowledge of science and engineering fundamentals:

CBEN312/313UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY6.0
CBEN402CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN3.0
CBEN403PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL3.0
CBEN418KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING3.0
Technical Electives for Chemical Engineering

C. Technical Electives for Chemical Engineering

Whereas Chemical and Biochemical Engineering majors have specific additional required courses to give them the biochemical engineering training they need, Chemical Engineering majors have technical electives credit requirements that may be fulfilled with several different courses.

Requirements (Chemical Engineering)

There are 10 credits specifically required for Chemical and Biochemical Engineering that are not specified for Chemical Engineering.  Three of these may be any CHGN or CBEN 3XX or higher credits, 6 must be CBEN engineering credits, and 1 is an additional elective credit.

NOTE:  Below is a suggested curriculum path.  Electives may be taken any time they fit into your schedule, but note that not all courses are offered all semesters.  Please refer to  http://chemeng.mines.edu/undergraduate_program.html for the most updated flowsheet.

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
EPIC151DESIGN (EPICS) I  3.0
BIOL110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I  4.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
PAGN101PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1)  4.0
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
PAGN102PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
17.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN210INTRO TO THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN223ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS3.53.04.5
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN201MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES  3.0
CBEN202CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES LABORATORY  1.0
CHGN222ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
EPIC265EPIC II: BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES  3.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS3.0 3.0
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN307FLUID MECHANICS  3.0
CBEN357CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I3.03.04.0
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
FREEFREE ELECTIVE*  3.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN308HEAT TRANSFER  3.0
CBEN375MASS TRANSFER  3.0
CBEN358CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS LABORATORY  1.0
CBEN/CHGN ELECT CHEMISTRY OR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ELECTIVE**3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE I3.0 3.0
FREEFREE ELECTIVE*  3.0
16.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
CBEN312/313UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY  6.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN418KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING  3.0
CBEN430TRANSPORT PHENOMENA  3.0
CBEN ELECTCHEMICAL ENGINEERING ELECTIVE***  3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE II3.0 3.0
FREE FREE ELECTIVE*  4.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN402CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN  3.0
CBEN403PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL  3.0
CBEN421ENGINEERING ECONOMICS  3.0
CBEN ELECT400-LEVEL CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ELECTIVE***  3.0
LAIS/EBGNH&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE III  3.0
15.0
Total Hours: 134.5
*

Six of the technical electives credits must be CBEN courses with engineering content (http://chemeng.mines.edu/undergraduate_program.html), at least 3 of which must be at the 400 level.

**

Three of the technical electives credits may be any CBEN or CHGN credits at the 300-or higher level.

***

Note the 10 free electives credits may be taken as any combination of eligible courses (http://chemeng.mines.edu/undergraduate_program.html)

Requirements (Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

Freshman
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CHGN121PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I  4.0
CSM101FRESHMAN SUCCESS SEMINAR  0.5
EPIC151DESIGN (EPICS) I  3.0
BIOL110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I  4.0
MATH111CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I  4.0
PAGN101PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
LAIS100NATURE AND HUMAN VALUES  4.0
CHGN122PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (SC1)  4.0
MATH112CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II  4.0
PHGN100PHYSICS I - MECHANICS  4.5
PAGN102PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
17.0
Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN210INTRO TO THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN221ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I3.0 3.0
CHGN223ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS3.53.04.5
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN201MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES  3.0
CBEN202CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES LABORATORY  1.0
CHGN222ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II3.0 3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
EPIC265EPIC II: BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES3.0 3.0
MATH225DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS3.0 3.0
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN307FLUID MECHANICS  3.0
CBEN357CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
CHGN351PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY: A MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVE I*3.03.04.0
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
FREE FREE ELECTIVE**3.0 3.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN308HEAT TRANSFER  3.0
CBEN358CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS LABORATORY  1.0
CBEN375MASS TRANSFER  3.0
CHGN428BIOCHEMISTRY*3.0 3.0
CHGN462MICROBIOLOGY3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE I3.0 3.0
16.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
CBEN312/313UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY  6.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
CBEN418KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING  3.0
CBEN430TRANSPORT PHENOMENA  3.0
CBEN460BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING  3.0
CBEN461BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING LABORATORY  1.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE II3.0 3.0
FREE FREE ELECTIVE**3.0 3.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
CBEN402CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN  3.0
CBEN403PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL  3.0
CBEN421ENGINEERING ECONOMICS  3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS RESTRICTED ELECTIVE III3.0 3.0
FREE FREE ELECTIVE**3.0 3.0
15.0
Total Hours: 134.5
*

For 2014/2015 academic year, Chemical and Biological Engineering students should take CBEN428 in the Fall semester and CBEN 351 in the Spring semester.

**

Three of the technical electives credits may be any CBEN or CHGN credits at the 300- or higher level.(http://chemeng.mines.edu/undergraduate_program.html)

General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.

Biomedical Engineering Minor

To obtain a Biomedical Engineering (BME) minor, students must take at least 18 credits related to Biomedical Engineering.  Two courses (8 credits) of biology are required.  Two restricted requirements include Intro to Biomedical Engineering (required) and at least 3 credits of engineering electives related to BME.  Two more courses (or at least 4 credits) may be chosen from the engineering and/or additional electives.  The lists of electives will be modified as new related courses that fall into these categories become available.

REQUIRED courses (11 credits):

BIOL110FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I4.0
CBEN303/323GENERAL BIOLOGY II/LABORATORY4.0
CBEN310INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING3.0

Plus at least 3 credits of engineering electives:

CBEN35x/45x/x98/x99HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH, SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY *1-4
CBEN432TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS3.0
CBEN470INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS3.0
CBEN555POLYMER AND COMPLEX FLUIDS COLLOQUIUM1.0
MEGN330INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING3.0
MEGN430MUSCULOSKELETAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN435MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT3.0
or MEGN535 MODELING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT
MEGN436COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS3.0
or MEGN536 COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS
MEGN530BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION3.0
MEGN531PROSTHETIC AND IMPLANT ENGINEERING3.0
MEGN532EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN BIOMECHANICS3.0
MEGN537PROBABILISTIC BIOMECHANICS3.0
MTGN570BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MATERIALS3.0

Plus at least 4 more credits from the list above and/or the list below:

Additional elective courses related to BME:

CBEN304ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY3.0
CBEN305ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB1.0
CBEN306ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN3.0
CBEN309ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN LABORATORY1.0
CBEN311INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE3.0
CBEN320CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY3.0
CBEN321INTRO TO GENETICS4.0
CBEN333INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS3.0
or PHGN333 INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS
CBEN35x/45x/x98/x99HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH, SPECIAL TOPICS, INDEPENDENT STUDY1-4
CBEN411NEUROSCIENCE, MEMORY, AND LEARNING (NEUROSCIENCE, MEMORY, AND LEARNING)3.0
CBEN412INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY (INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY)3.0
CHGN428BIOCHEMISTRY3.0
CBEN431IMMUNOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS3.0
or CBEN531 IMMUNOLOGY FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS
CBEN454APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS3.0
or CBEN554 APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS
CHGN429BIOCHEMISTRY II3.0
CHGN462MICROBIOLOGY3.0
MATH331MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY3.0
MTGN472BIOMATERIALS I3.0
or MTGN572 BIOMATERIALS

 *As the content of these courses varies, the course must be noted as relevant to the BME minor to count toward the minor, and noted as having sufficient engineering content to count as an engineering elective course as the engineering electives.

Courses

BIOL110. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY I. 4.0 Hours.

(I, II) Fundamentals of Biology with Laboratory I. This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of biology and use illustrative examples and laboratory investigations that highlight the interface of biology with engineering. The focus will be on (1) the scientific method; (2) structural, molecular, and energetic basis of cellular activities; (3) mechanisms of storage and transfer of genetic information in biological organisms; (4) a laboratory ?toolbox? that will carry them forward in their laboratory-based courses. This core course in biology will be interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the major themes and mission of this school ? earth, energy, and the environment. Prerequisite: none. Lecture Hours: 3; Lab Hours: 3; Semester Hours: 4.

CBEN198. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.

Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CBEN199. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.

Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head, submission of ?Independent Study? form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

CBEN200. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

Fundamentals of computer programming as applied to the solution of chemical engineering problems. Introduction to Visual Basic, computational methods and algorithm development. Prerequisite: MATH112 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN201. MATERIAL AND ENERGY BALANCES. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Introduction to the formulation and solution of material and energy balances on chemical processes. Establishes the engineering approach to problem solving, the relations between known and unknown process variables, and appropriate computational methods. Corequisites: CBEN210 (or equivalent); CBEN202, MATH213, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN202. CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(II) Laboratory measurements dealing with the first and second laws of thermodynamics, calculation and analysis of experimental results, professional report writing. Introduction to computer-aided process simulation. Corequisites: CBEN210 (or equivalent), CBEN201, MATH225, EPIC265 or EPIC266 or EPIC251, or consent of instructor. 3 hours laboratory; 1 credit hour.

CBEN210. INTRO TO THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.

(I, II) Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical engineering thermodynamics. Application of mass and energy balances to closed and open systems including systems undergoing transient processes. Entropy generation and the second law of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Introduction to phase equilibrium and chemical reaction equilibria. Ideal solution behavior. Prerequisites: CHGN121, CHGN124, MATH111, MATH112, PHGN100. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Students with credit in CHGN209 may not also receive credit in CBEN210.

CBEN250. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

Introduction to chemical process industries and how analysis and design concepts guide the development of new processes and products. Use of simple mathematical models to describe the performance of common process building blocks including pumps, heat exchangers, chemical reactors, and separators. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in CBEN210 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN298. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.

Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CBEN303. GENERAL BIOLOGY II. 3.0 Hours.

(I, II) This is the continuation of General Biology I. Emphasis is placed on an examination of organisms as the products of evolution. The diversity of life forms will be explored. Special attention will be given to the vertebrate body (organs, tissues, and systems) and how it functions. Prerequisite: General Biology I, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN304. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) This course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system and blood, the immune system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the endocrine system, the urinary system and the reproductive system. We will discuss the gross and microscopic anatomy and the physiology of these major systems. Where possible, we will integrate discussions of disease processes and introduce biomedical engineering concepts and problems. Prerequisite: General Biology I or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN305. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LAB. 1.0 Hour.

(II) In this course we explore the basic concepts of human anatomy and physiology using simulations of the physiology and a virtual human dissector program. These are supplemented as needed with animations, pictures and movies of cadaver dissection to provide the student with a practical experience discovering principles and structures associated with the anatomy and physiology. Corequisite: CBEN404. 3 lab hours, 1 semester hour.

CBEN306. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN. 3.0 Hours.

(I) This course will cover the basics of human anatomy and physiology of the tissues, skeletal system, muscular system, central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. We will discuss the gross and microscopic anatomy and the physiology of these major systems. Where possible, we will integrate discussions of disease processes and introduce biomedical engineering concepts and problems. Prerequisite: General Biology I or consent of instructor. 3 hour lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN307. FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.

(I) This course covers theory and application of momentum transfer and fluid flow. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work also includes computational fluid dynamics. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or better in CBEN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN308. HEAT TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.

(II) This course covers theory and applications of energy transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Fundamentals of microscopic phenomena and their application to macroscopic systems are addressed. Course work also includes application of relevant numerical methods to solve heat transfer problems. Prerequisites: MATH225, grade of C- or better in CBEN307. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN309. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: BONE, MUSCLE, AND BRAIN LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(I) In this course we explore the basic concepts of human anatomy and physiology of the tissue types, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system using anatomical models and medical tissue microscope slides. These are supplemented as needed with pictures, chalk talks, handouts, ultrasound for muscle and skeleton, and EEG recording of brain waves to provide the student with a practical experience discovering principles and structures associated with the anatomy and physiology and to reinforce the material from the lecture course. Prerequisite: General Biology 1 [BIOL110] or approval of the instructor. Co-requisites: must either have taken or currently taking Anatomy and Physiology BMB [CBEN406]. 3 hour lab; 1 semester hour.

CBEN310. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Introduction to the field of Biomedical Engineering including biomolecular, cellular, and physiological principles, and areas of specialty including biomolecular engineering, biomaterials, biomechanics, bioinstrumentation and bioimaging. Prerequisites: BIOL110, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CBEN311. INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE. 3.0 Hours.

(I, II) This course is the general overview of brain anatomy, physiology, and function. It includes perception, motor, language, behavior, and executive function. This course will review what happens with injury and abnormalities of thought. It will discuss the overview of brain development throughout one?s lifespan. Prerequisites: BIOL110, CHGN121, CHGN122, PHGN100, PHGN200 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN312. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.

(S) (WI) Unit Operations Laboratory. This course covers principles of mass, energy, and momentum transport as applied to laboratory-scale processing equipment. Written and oral communications skills, teamwork, and critical thinking are emphasized. 6 hours lab, 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: CBEN201, CBEN202, CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, EPIC265 or equivalent.

CBEN313. UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY. 3.0 Hours.

(S) (WI) Unit Operations Laboratory. This course covers principles of mass, energy, and momentum transport as applied to laboratory-scale processing equipment. Written and oral communications skills, teamwork, and critical thinking are emphasized. 6 hours lab, 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: CBEN201, CBEN202, CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, EPIC265 or equivalent.

CBEN320. CELL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) An introduction to the morphological, biochemical, and biophysical properties of cells and their significance in the life processes. Prerequisite: General Biology I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN321. INTRO TO GENETICS. 4.0 Hours.

(II) A study of the mechanisms by which biological information is encoded, stored, and transmitted, including Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, chromosome structure and rearrangement, cytogenetics, and population genetics. Prerequisite: General biology I or equivalent. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory; 4 semester hours.

CBEN323. GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(I, II) This Course provides students with laboratory exercises that complement lectures given in CBEN303, the second semester introductory course in Biology. Emphasis is placed on an examination of organisms as the products of evolution. The diversity of life forms will be explored. Special attention will be given to the vertebrate body (organs, tissues and systems) and how it functions. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: CBEN303 or equivalent. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.

CBEN333. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS. 3.0 Hours.

This course is designed to show the application of physics to biology. It will assess the relationships between sequence structure and function in complex biological networks and the interfaces between physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. Topics include: biological membranes, biological mechanics and movement, neural networks, medical imaging basics including optical methods, MRI, isotopic tracers and CT, biomagnetism and pharmacokinetics. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and BIOL110, or permission of the instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CBEN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.

Cooperative work/education experience involving employment of a chemical engineering nature in an internship spanning at least one academic semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 hours.

CBEN350. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.

Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: Junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.

CBEN351. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.

Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: junior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.

CBEN357. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Introduction to non-ideal behavior in thermodynamic systems and their applications. Phase and reaction equilibria are emphasized. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation are incorporated. Prerequisites: CBEN210 (or equivalent), MATH225, grade of C- or better in CBEN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN358. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(II) This course includes an introduction to process modeling as well as hands-on laboratory measurements of physical data. Methods and concepts explored include calculation and analysis of physical properties, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria and the application of these concepts in chemical engineering. Prerequisite: CBEN202. Corequisites: CBEN357, EPIC265 or EPIC266 or EPIC251. 3 hours laboratory; 1 semester hour.

CBEN368. INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1.0 Hour.

(I, II) Introduction to Undergraduate Research. This course introduces research methods and provides a survey of the various fields in which CBE faculty conduct research. Topics such as how to conduct literature searches, critically reading and analyzing research articles, ethics, lab safety, and how to write papers are addressed. Prerequisites: None. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.

CBEN375. MASS TRANSFER. 3.0 Hours.

(II) This course covers fundamentals of stage-wise and diffusional mass transport with applications to chemical engineering systems and processes. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation and computational methods are incorporated. Prerequisites: grade of C- or better in CBEN357. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN398. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.

Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CBEN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.

Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head, submission of ?Independent Study? form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

CBEN401. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(I) This course introduces skills and knowledge required to develop conceptual designs of new processes and tools to analyze troubleshoot, and optimize existing processes. Prerequisites: CBEN201, CBEN308, CBEN307, CBEN357, CBEN375 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN402. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(II) (WI) This course covers simulation, synthesis, analysis, evaluation, as well as costing and economic evaluation of chemical processes. Computer-aided process simulation to plant and process design is applied. 3 hours lecture; 3 Semester hours. Prerequisites: CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, CBEN418 (co-requisite), CBEN421 (co-requisite), or consent of instructor.

CBEN403. PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Mathematical modeling and analysis of transient systems. Applications of control theory to response of dynamic chemical engineering systems and processes. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: CBEN201, CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN375, MATH225 or consent on instructor.

CBEN408. NATURAL GAS PROCESSING. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of natural gas. Emphasis on using thermodynamics and mass transfer operations to analyze existing plants. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation. Prerequisites: CHGN221, CBEN201, CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CBEN409. PETROLEUM PROCESSES. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Application of chemical engineering principles to petroleum refining. Thermodynamics and reaction engineering of complex hydro carbon systems. Relevant aspects of computer-aided process simulation for complex mixtures. Prerequisite: CHGN221, CBEN201, CBEN357, CBEN375, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN411. NEUROSCIENCE, MEMORY, AND LEARNING. 3.0 Hours.

(I) This course relates the hard sciences of the brain and neuroscience to memory encoding and current learning theories. Pre-requisites are the completion of freshmen levels of the three courses: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Prerequisites: BIOL110, CBEN303, CHGN121, CHGN122, PHGN100, PHGN200 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CBEN412. INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) This course introduces the concepts of pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceuticals. It will discuss the delivery systems for pharmaceuticals and how they change with disease states. It will cover the modeling of drug delivery, absorption, excretion, and accumulation. The course will cover the different modeling systems for drug delivery and transport. Prerequisites: BIOL110, CBEN303, CHGN121, CHGN122 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

CBEN415. POLYMER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

Chemistry and thermodynamics of polymers and polymer solutions. Reaction engineering of polymerization. Characterization techniques based on solution properties. Materials science of polymers in varying physical states. Processing operations for polymeric materials and use in separations. Prerequisite: CHGN221, MATH225, CBEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN416. POLYMER ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

Polymer fluid mechanics, polymer rheological response, and polymer shape forming. Definition and measure ment of material properties. Interrelationships between response functions and correlation of data and material response. Theoretical approaches for prediction of polymer properties. Processing operations for polymeric materials; melt and flow instabilities. Prerequisite: CBEN307, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN418. KINETICS AND REACTION ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

(I) (WI) This course emphasizes applications of the fundamentals of thermodynamics, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, and material and energy balances to the engineering of reactive processes. Key topics include reactor design, acquisition and analysis of rate data, and heterogeneous catalysis. Computational methods as related to reactor and reaction modeling are incorporated. Prerequisites: CBEN308, CBEN357, MATH225, CHGN221, CHGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN420. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

Formulation and solution of chemical engineering problems using numerical solution methods within the Excel and MathCAD environments. Setup and numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations for typical chemical engineering systems and transport processes. Prerequisite: MATH225, CHGN209 or CBEN210, CBEN307, CBEN357, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN421. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Time value of money concepts of present worth, future worth, annual worth, rate of return and break-even analysis applied to after-tax economic analysis of mineral, petroleum and general investments. Related topics on proper handling of (1) inflation and escalation, (2) leverage (borrowed money), (3) risk adjustment of analysis using expected value concepts, (4) mutually exclusive alternative analysis and service producing alternatives. Prerequisite: EBGN201. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN430. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3.0 Hours.

(I) This course covers theory and applications of momentum, energy, and mass transfer based on microscopic control volumes. Analytical and numerical solution methods are employed in this course. Prerequisites: CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, MATH225. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN431. IMMUNOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) This course introduces the basic concepts of immunology and their applications in engineering and science. We will discuss the molecular, biochemical and cellular aspects of the immune system including structure and function of the innate and acquired immune systems. Building on this, we will discuss the immune response to infectious agents and the material science of introduced implants and materials such as heart valves, artificial joints, organ transplants and lenses. We will also discuss the role of the immune system in cancer, allergies, immune deficiencies, vaccination and other applications such as immunoassay and flow cytometry.Prerequisites: General Biology [BIOL110] or equivalent. 3 Lecture hours, 3 semester hours.

CBEN432. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.

The goal of this course is to develop and analyze models of biological transport and reaction processes. We will apply the principles of mass, momentum, and energy conservation to describe mechanisms of physiology and pathology. We will explore the applications of transport phenomena in the design of drug delivery systems, engineered tissues, and biomedical diagnostics with an emphasis on the barriers to molecular transport in cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prerequisites: CBEN430 or equivalent. 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

CBEN435. INTERDISCIPLINARY MICROELECTRONICS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Application of science and engineering principles to the design, fabrication, and testing of microelectronic devices. Emphasis on specific unit operations and the interrelation among processing steps. Prerequisites: Senior standing in PHGN, CBEN, MTGN, or EGGN. Consent of instructor. Due to lab, space the enrollment is limited to 20 students. 1.5 hours lecture, 4 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

CBEN440. MOLECULAR PERSPECTIVES IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

Applications of statistical and quantum mechanics to understanding and prediction of equilibrium and transport properties and processes. Relations between microscopic properties of materials and systems to macroscopic behavior. Prerequisite: CBEN307, CBEN308, CBEN357, CBEN375, CHGN351 and CHGN353, CHGN221 and CHGN222, MATH225, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN450. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.

Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.

CBEN451. HONORS UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. 1-3 Hour.

Scholarly research of an independent nature. Prerequisite: senior standing, consent of instructor. 1 to 3 semester hours.

CBEN454. APPLIED BIOINFORMATICS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) In this course we will discuss the concepts and tools of bioinformatics. The molecular biology of genomics and proteomics will be presented and the techniques for collecting, storing, retrieving and processing such data will be discussed. Topics include analyzing DNA, RNA and protein sequences, gene recognition, gene expression, protein structure prediction, modeling evolution, utilizing BLAST and other online tools for the exploration of genome, proteome and other available databases. In parallel, there will be an introduction to the PERL programming language. Practical applications to biological research and disease will be presented and students given opportunities to use the tools discussed. Prerequisites: General Biology [BIOL110] or Senior/Graduate standing. 3 hour lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN460. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

(I) The analysis and design of microbial reactions and biochemical unit operations, including processes used in conjunction with bioreactors, are investigated in this course. Industrial enzyme technologies are developed and explored. A strong focus is given to the basic processes for producing fermentation products and biofuels. Biochemical systems for organic oxidation and fermentation and inorganic oxidation and reduction are presented. Prerequisites: CBEN375, CHGN428, CHGN462 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN461. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(I) This course emphasizes bio-based product preparation, laboratory measurement, and calculation and analysis of bioprocesses including fermentation and bio-solids separations and their application to biochemical engineering. Computer-aided process simulation is incorporated. Prerequisites: CBEN375, CHGN428, CHGN462 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: CBEN460, 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.

CBEN469. FUEL CELL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Investigate fundamentals of fuel-cell operation and electrochemistry from a chemical-thermodynamics and materials-science perspective. Review types of fuel cells, fuel-processing requirements and approaches, and fuel-cell system integration. Examine current topics in fuel-cell science and technology. Fabricate and test operational fuel cells in the Colorado Fuel Cell Center. Prerequisites: MEGN361 or CBEN357 or MTGN351, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN470. INTRODUCTION TO MICROFLUIDICS. 3.0 Hours.

This course introduces the basic principles and applications of microfluidic systems. Concepts related to microscale fluid mechanics, transport, physics, and biology are presented. To gain familiarity with small-scale systems, students are provided with the opportunity to design, fabricate, and test a simple microfluidic device. Prerequisites: CBEN307 (or equivalent) or MEGN351 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor. 3 semester hours.

CBEN472. INTRODUCTION TO ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES. 3.0 Hours.

(II) In this course the student will gain an understanding about energy technologies including how they work, how they are quantitatively evaluated, what they cost, and what is their benefit or impact on the natural environment. There will be discussions about proposed energy systems and how they might become a part of the existing infrastructure. However, to truly understand the impact of proposed energy systems, the student must also have a grasp on the infrastructure of existing energy systems. Prerequisites: CBEN357 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (or equivalent). 3 lecture hours, 3 credit hours.

CBEN480. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES. 3.0 Hours.

The purpose of this class is to learn about clathrate hydrates, using two of the instructor's books, (1) Clathrate Hydrates of Natural Gases, Third Edition (2008) co-authored by C.A.Koh, and (2) Hydrate Engineering, (2000). Using a basis of these books, and accompanying programs, we have abundant resources to act as professionals who are always learning. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

CBEN497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Hours.

CBEN498. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-6 Hour.

Topical courses in chemical engineering of special interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

CBEN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.

Individual research or special problem projects. Topics, content, and credit hours to be agreed upon by student and supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and department head, submission of ?Independent Study? form to CSM Registrar. 1 to 6 semester hours. Repeatable for credit.

Dean of the College of Applied Sciences and Engineering

Anthony M. Dean, W.K. Coors Distinguished Professor

Professors

John R. Dorgan

Carolyn A. Koh

David W. M. Marr, Department Head

Ronald L. Miller

J. Douglas Way

Colin A. Wolden, Weaver Distinguished Professor

David T.W. Wu, by courtesy

Associate Professors

Sumit Agarwal

Moises Carreon, Coors Developmental Chair

Andrew M. Herring

Matthew W. Liberatore

Keith B. Neeves

Amadeu K. Sum

Assistant Professors

Nanette Boyle, Coors Developmental Chair

Kevin J. Cash

Melissa D. Krebs

C. Mark Maupin

Ning Wu

Teaching Professor

Hugh King

Teaching Associate Professors

Jason C. Ganley

Tracy Q. Gardner, Assistant Department Head

Rachel Morrish

Cynthia Norrgran

Paul D. Ogg

John M. Persichetti

Judith N. Schoonmaker

Charles R. Vestal

Professors Emeriti

Robert M. Baldwin

Annette L. Bunge

James F. Ely, University Professor Emeritus

James H. Gary

John O. Golden

Arthur J. Kidnay

J. Thomas McKinnon

E. Dendy Sloan, Jr., University Professor Emeritus

Victor F. Yesavage

Research Associate Professor

Angel Abbud-Madrid

Research Assistant Professor

Stephanie Villano

Adjunct Faculty

David Gill

John Jechura

C. Joshua Ramey