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Geology and Geological Engineering


2014-2015

Program Description

A Bachelor of Science degree in Geological Engineering is the basis for careers concentrating on the interaction of humans and the earth. Geological Engineers deal with a wide variety of the resource and environmental problems that come with accommodating more and more people on a finite planet. Geologic hazards and conditions must be recognized and considered in the location and design of foundations for buildings, roads and other structures; waste disposal facilities must be properly located, designed and constructed; contaminated sites and ground water must be accurately characterized before cleanup can be accomplished; water supplies must be located, developed and protected; and new mineral and energy resources must be located and developed in an environmentally sound manner. Geological Engineers are the professionals trained to meet these challenges.

The Geological Engineering curriculum provides a strong foundation in the basic sciences, mathematics, geological science and basic engineering along with specialized upper level instruction in integrated applications to real problems. Engineering design is integrated throughout the four year program, beginning in Design I (Freshman year) and ending with the capstone design courses in the senior year. The program is accredited by the:

Engineering Accreditation Commission of Accreditation Inc
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Students have the background to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam, the first step in becoming a registered Professional Engineer.

Graduates follow five general career paths:

Engineering Geology and Geotechnics. Careers in site investigation, design and stabilization of foundations and slopes; site characterization, design, construction and remediation of waste disposal sites or contaminated sites; and assessment of geologic hazards for civil, mining or environmental engineering projects.

Ground-Water Engineering. Careers in assessment and remediation of ground-water contamination, design of ground-water control facilities for geotechnical projects and exploration for and development of ground-water supplies.

Petroleum Exploration and Development Engineering. Careers in search for and development of oil and gas and their efficient extraction.

Mineral Exploration and Development Engineering. Careers in search for and development of natural deposits of metals, industrial materials and rock aggregate.

Geological Science. Students are also well prepared to pursue careers in basic geoscience. Graduates have become experts in fields as divergent as global climate change, the early history of the Earth, planetary science, fractal representation of ground-water flow and simulation of sedimentary rock sequences, to name a few. Careers are available in research and education.

The curriculum may be followed along two concentration paths with slightly different upper division requirements. Both concentrations are identical in the first two years as students study basic science, mathematics, engineering science, and geological science. In the junior year those students pursuing careers in ground-water engineering, engineering geology and geotechnics, or geoenvironmental engineering applications follow the Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration. Students anticipating careers in resource exploration and development or who expect to pursue graduate studies in geological sciences follow the Mineral and Petroleum Exploration Engineering Concentration.

At all levels the Geological Engineering Program emphasizes laboratory and field experience. All courses have a laboratory session, and after the junior year students participate in a field course, which is six weeks of geologic and engineering mapping and direct observation. The course involves considerable time outdoors in the mountains and canyons of Utah and southwestern Colorado.

At the senior level, students begin to focus on a career path by taking course sequences in at least two areas of geological engineering specialization. The course sequences begin with a 4 unit course in the fundamentals of a field of geological engineering which is followed by a 3 unit design-oriented course that emphasizes experience in direct application of principles through design projects.

Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs

Several degree programs offer CSM undergraduate students the opportunity to begin work on a Graduate Certificate, Professional Degree, or Master Degree while completing the requirements for their Bachelor Degree. These programs can give students a head start on graduate education. An overview of these combined programs and description of the admission process and requirements are found in the Graduate Degrees and Requirements section of the Graduate Bulletin.

Program Educational Objectives (Bachelor of Science in Geological Engineering)

In addition to contributing toward achieving the educational objectives described in the CSM Graduate Profile and the ABET Accreditation Criteria, the Geological Engineering Program at CSM has established the following program educational objectives, which students are expected to attain within a few years of graduation:

1.  Demonstrate a high level of technical competence

2.  Demonstrate prowess in written, oral and graphical communication

3.  Experience good teamwork and leadership practices

Program Requirements

In order to achieve the program goals listed above, every student working toward the Bachelor of Science Degree in Geological Engineering must complete the following requirements:

Degree Requirements (Geological Engineering)

Sophomore
Fallleclabsem.hrs
GEGN203ENGINEERING TERRAIN ANALYSIS2.0 2.0
GEGN204GEOLOGIC PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES2.0 2.0
GEGN205ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY 3.01.0
MATH213CALCULUS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III4.0 4.0
CEEN241STATICS  3.0
LAIS200HUMAN SYSTEMS  3.0
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
15.5
Springleclabsem.hrs
EPIC264EPICS II: GEOLOGY GIS2.03.03.0
GEGN206EARTH MATERIALS2.03.03.0
PHGN200PHYSICS II-ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS3.53.04.5
MATH222INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR GEOLOGISTS & GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS*  2.0
CEEN311MECHANICS OF MATERIALS  3.0
PAGN2XX PHYSICAL EDUCATION  0.5
16.0
Total Hours: 31.5


 

*

 Only one of MATH222 and MATH225 can be counted toward graduation in GE. Any student who completes MATH222 and then changes majors out of Geology and Geological Engineering will be expected to complete MATH225 to meet graduation requirements. (In this case, MATH222 cannot be counted toward graduation in any manner - even as a free elective.)

Following the sophomore year, Geological Engineering students choose from one of two concentrations:

  1. Minerals and Petroleum Exploration Engineering
  2. Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and Ground-water Engineering

Minerals and Petroleum Exploration Engineering Concentration

Recommended for students intending careers in exploration and development of mineral and fuels resources, or intending careers in geoscience research and education.

Freshman
leclabsem.hrs
CORE Common Core  33.0
33.0
Sophomore
leclabsem.hrs
CORE Sophomore Year  31.5
31.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
GEOL309STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTONICS3.03.04.0
GEOL321MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION2.03.03.0
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
CEEN312SOIL MECHANICS or MNGN 321  3.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
GEGN307PETROLOGY2.03.03.0
GEGN317GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS1.08.02.0
GEOL314STRATIGRAPHY3.03.04.0
GEGN351GEOLOGICAL FLUID MECHANICS3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective I3.0 3.0
TECH ELECT Tech Elective II*3.0 3.0
18.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
GEGN316FIELD GEOLOGY 6.06.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
GEGN ELECT GEGN4xx Option Elective3.03.04.0
GEGN ELECT GEGN4xx Option Elective3.03.04.0
GEGN432GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT1.06.03.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective II3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
17.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
GEGN ELECT GEGN4xx Design Elective2.03.03.0
GEGN ELECT GEGN 4xx Design Elective2.03.03.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective III3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
FREE Free Elective  3.0
15.0
Total Hours: 136.5
*

Technical Electives I & II: Either MNGN321 or CEEN312 is required as ONE of the technical electives. An additional technical elective must be selected from a department list of approved courses. The technical elective credits must total a minimum of 6 hours of engineering topics with a minimum of 3 credit hours of engineering design.

Option Electives
Student must take TWO of the following four courses:8.0
MINERAL DEPOSITS
PETROLEUM GEOLOGY
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS
Design Electives
Students must take TWO of the following design courses, corresponding in subject area to the Option Elective:6.0
MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN
GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN

Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration

Recommended for students intending careers in geotechnical engineering, hydrogeology, or other environmental engineering careers.

Freshman
leclabsem.hrs
CORE Common Core  33.0
33.0
Sophomore
leclabsem.hrs
CORE Sophomore Year  31.5
31.5
Junior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
GEGN212PETROGRAPHY FOR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS1.03.02.0
GEOL309STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTONICS3.03.04.0
CHGN209INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS or MEGN 361  3.0
EBGN201PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS3.0 3.0
CEEN312SOIL MECHANICS  3.0
CEEN312LSOIL MECHANICS LABORATORY  1.0
16.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
GEGN317GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS1.08.02.0
GEGN473GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVESTIGATION3.0 3.0
GEOL314STRATIGRAPHY3.03.04.0
GEGN351GEOLOGICAL FLUID MECHANICS3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective I3.0 3.0
MNGN321INTRODUCTION TO ROCK MECHANICS2.03.03.0
18.0
Summerleclabsem.hrs
GEGN316FIELD GEOLOGY 6.06.0
6.0
Senior
Fallleclabsem.hrs
GEGN468ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS3.03.04.0
GEGN467GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING3.03.04.0
GEGN432GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT1.06.03.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective II3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
17.0
Springleclabsem.hrs
GEGN469ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN3.0 3.0
GEGN470GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN3.0 3.0
LAIS/EBGN H&SS GenEd Restricted Elective III3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
FREE Free Elective3.0 3.0
15.0
Total Hours: 136.5

Students in the Environmental, Engineering Geology and Geotechnics, and Ground-Water Engineering Concentration may further specialize by utilizing their free elective courses to emphasize a specific specialty. Suggested courses are presented below and should be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. The emphasis area is an informal designation only and it will not appear on the transcript.

Engineering Geology and Geotechnics Emphasis

CEEN415FOUNDATIONS3.0
GEGN475APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS3.0
EBGN321ENGINEERING ECONOMICS3.0
GEGN399INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY1-6
GEGN499INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY1-6
GEGN307PETROLOGY3.0
GEOL321MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION3.0
CSCI261PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS3.0
MNGN404TUNNELING3.0
MNGN408UNDERGROUND DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION2.0
MNGN410EXCAVATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT2.0
MNGNnull445/545ROCK SLOPE ENGINEERING3.0

Water Engineering Emphasis

CEEN301FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I3.0
CEEN302FUNDAMENTALS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II3.0
CEEN461FUNDAMENTALS OF ECOLOGY3.0
CEEN470WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES3.0
CEEN471WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN3.0
CEEN475SITE REMEDIATION ENGINEERING3.0
CEEN480ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION: SOURCES, CHARACTERISTICS, TRANSPORT AND FATE3.0
CSCI260FORTRAN PROGRAMMING2.0
CSCI261PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS3.0
EBGN321ENGINEERING ECONOMICS3.0
CHGN403INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY3.0
CEEN492ENVIRONMENTAL LAW3.0
GEGN475APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS3.0
GEGN481ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY3.0
GEGN483MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS3.0
GEGN499INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY1-6
GEOL321MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION3.0
LAIS487ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY3.0
LAIS488WATER POLITICS AND POLICY3.0
MATH332LINEAR ALGEBRA3.0
MEGN451FLUID MECHANICS II3.0

General CSM Minor/ASI requirements can be found here.

Geological Engineering Minor and Area of Special Interest

To receive a minor or ASI, a student must take at least 12 (ASI) or 18 (minor) hours of a logical sequence of courses. This may include GEGN101 (4 hours) and up to 4 hours at the 200-level.

Students must consult with the Department to have their sequence of courses approved before embarking on a minor program.

Courses

GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours.

(I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the earth integrating the basic sciences of chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics. Understanding of anthropological interactions with the natural systems, and related discussions on cycling of energy and mass, global warming, natural hazards, land use, mitigation of environmental problems such as toxic waste disposal, exploitation and conservation of energy, mineral and agricultural resources, proper use of water resources, biodiversity and construction. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEGN203. ENGINEERING TERRAIN ANALYSIS. 2.0 Hours.

(I) Analysis of landforms, geologic processes, principles of geomorphology, mapping, air photo and map interpretation, and engineering uses of geologic information.. Geomorphology of glacial, volcanic, arid, karst, and complex geological landscapes. Introduction to weathering, soils, hillslopes, and drainage systems. Prerequisite: GEGN101. Must be taken concurrently with GEGN204 and GEGN205 for GE majors. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.

GEGN204. GEOLOGIC PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES. 2.0 Hours.

(I) Introduction to advanced concepts of physical and historical geology from a scientific perspective. Development of the geologic time scale, relative time, and geochronology. Chemical composition and cycling of elements in the Earth. Plate tectonics and how tectonics influence sea-level history and sedimentation patterns. Evolution and the fossil record. Critical events in Earth history with a focus on North America and Colorado geology. Prerequisite: GEGN101. Must be taken concurrently with GEGN203 and GEGN205 for GE majors. 2 hours lecture, 2 semester hours.

GEGN205. ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. 1.0 Hour.

(I) Basic geologic mapping and data gathering skills, with special emphasis on air photos and topographic and geologic maps. Course will include fieldwork in geomorphic regions of Colorado, with analysis of landforms and geologic processes. Applications of geologic information to solve geologic engineering problems. Prerequisite: GEGN101. Must be taken concurrently with GEGN203 and GEGN204 for GE majors. 3 hours laboratory, 1 semester hour.

GEGN206. EARTH MATERIALS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure, composition, formation, and behavior of minerals. Laboratories emphasize the recognition, description, and engineering evaluation of earth materials. Prerequisite: GEGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN212. PETROGRAPHY FOR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERS. 2.0 Hours.

(I) Introduction to concepts of rock forming processes as a basis for rock classification. The course will teach practical skills allowing identification of common rock types in hand specimen and in outcrop. Subsurface and nearsurface alteration and weathering processes will be covered, emphasizing recognition of secondary mineral products and the changes to the physical properties of these minerals in the rock masses. Prerequisites: GEGN206 or equivalent. 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab; 2 semester hours.

GEGN299. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

GEGN307. PETROLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) An introduction to igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic processes, stressing the application of chemical and physical mechanisms to study the origin, occurrence, and association of rock types. Emphasis on the megascopic and microscopic classification, description, and interpretation of rocks. Analysis of the fabric and physical properties. Prerequisite: GEOL321, CHGN209. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN316. FIELD GEOLOGY. 6.0 Hours.

(S) Six weeks of field work, stressing geology of the Southern Rocky Mountain Province. Mapping of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary terrain using air photos, topographic maps, and other methods. Diversified individual problems in petroleum geology, mining geology, engineering geology, structural geology, and stratigraphy. Formal reports submitted on several problems. Frequent evening lectures and discussion sessions. Field trips emphasize regional geology as well as mining, petroleum, and engineering projects. Prerequisites: GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205, GEGN206, GEGN212 or GEGN307, GEOL314, GEOL309, and GEGN317. 6 semester hours (Summer Term).

GEGN317. GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS. 2.0 Hours.

(II) Methods and techniques of geologic field observations and interpretations. Lectures in field techniques and local geology. Laboratory and field project in diverse sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic, structural, and surficial terrains using aerial photographs and topographic maps. Geologic cross sections, maps, and reports. Weekend exercises required. Prerequisites: GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205, GEOL309 or GEOL308, GEGN212 or completion or concurrent enrollment in GEGN307, and completion or concurrent enrollment in GEOL314. 1 hour lecture, 8 hours field; 2 semester hours.

GEGN340. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 1-3 Hour.

(I, II, S) Supervised, full-time, engineering-related employment for a continuous six-month period (or its equivalent) in which specific educational objectives are achieved. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore status and a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00. 1 to 3 semester hours. Cooperative Education credit does not count toward graduation except under special conditions. Repeatable.

GEGN342. ENGINEERING GEOMORPHOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Study of interrelationships between internal and external earth processes, geologic materials, time, and resulting landforms on the Earth?s surface. Influences of geomorphic processes on design of natural resource exploration programs and siting and design of geotechnical and geohydrologic projects. Laboratory analysis of geomorphic and geologic features utilizing maps, photo interpretation and field observations. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN351. GEOLOGICAL FLUID MECHANICS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Properties of fluids; Bernoulli's energy equation, the momentum and mass equations; laminar and turbulent flow in pipes, channels, machinery, and earth materials; subcritical and supercritical flow in channels; Darcy's Law; the Coriolis effect and geostrophic flow in the oceans and atmosphere; sediment transport. Prerequisite: CEEN241 or permission of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEGN398. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

GEGN399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

GEGN401. MINERAL DEPOSITS. 4.0 Hours.

(I) Introductory presentation of magmatic, hydrothermal, and sedimentary metallic ore deposits. Chemical, petrologic, structural, and sedimentological processes that contribute to ore formation. Description of classic deposits representing individual deposit types. Review of exploration sequences. Laboratory consists of hand specimen study of host rock-ore mineral suites and mineral deposit evaluation problems. Prerequisite: CHGN209, GEGN307, GEGN316, or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEGN403. MINERAL EXPLORATION DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(II) (WI) Exploration project design: commodity selection, target selection, genetic models, alternative exploration approaches and associated costs, exploration models, property acquisition, and preliminary economic evaluation. Lectures and laboratory exercises to simulate the entire exploration sequence from inception and planning through implementation to discovery, with initial ore reserve calculations and preliminary economic evaluation. Prerequisite: GEGN401 and EPIC251. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN404. ORE MICROSCOPY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Identification of ore minerals using reflected light microscopy, micro-hardness, and reflectivity techniques. Interpretation of common ore mineral textures, including those produced by magmatic segregation, open space filling, replacement, exsolution, and recrystallization. Guided research on the ore mineralogy and ore textures of classical ore deposits. Prerequisite: GEOL321, GEGN401, or consent of instructor. 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN432. GEOLOGICAL DATA MANAGEMENT. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Techniques for managing and analyzing geological data, including statistical analysis procedures and computer programming. Topics addressed include elementary probability, populations and distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of data sequences, mapping, sampling and sample representativity, linear regression, and overview of univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Practical experience with principles of software programming and statistical analysis for geological applications via suppled software and data sets from geological case histories. Prerequistes: Senior standing in Geological Engineering or permission of instructor. 1 hour lecture, 6 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN438. PETROLEUM GEOLOGY. 4.0 Hours.

(I) Source rocks, reservoir rocks, types of traps, temperature and pressure conditions of the reservoir, theories of origin and accumulation of petroleum, geology of major petroleum fields and provinces of the world, and methods of exploration for petroleum. Term report required. Laboratory consists of study of well log analysis, stratigraphic correlation, production mapping, hydrodynamics and exploration exercises. Prerequisite: GEOL308 or GEOL309 and GEOL314 or GEOL315; and GEGN316 or GPGN486 or PEGN316. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEGN439. MULTIDISCIPLINARY PETROLEUM DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(II) (WI) This is a multi-disciplinary design course that integrates fundamentals and design concepts in geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering. Students work in integrated teams consisting of students from each of the disciplines. Multiple open-ended design problems in oil and gas exploration and field development, including the development of a prospect in an exploration play and a detailed engineering field study are assigned. Several detailed written and oral presentations are made throughout the semester. Project economics including risk analysis are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: GE Majors: GEOL309, GEOL314, GEGN438, and EPIC264; GP Majors: GPGN302, GPGN303, and EPIC268; PE Majors: GEOL308, PEGN316 and PEGN426. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN466. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Theory of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwater to surface; potential distribution and flow; theory of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contaminant transport. Prerequisite: mathematics through calculus and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL315, and GEGN351,or MEGN351 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 semester hours.

GEGN467. GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING. 4.0 Hours.

(I) Theory of groundwater occurrence and flow. Relation of groundwater to surface water; potential distribution and flow; theory of aquifer tests; water chemistry, water quality, and contaminant transport. Laboratory sessions on water budgets, water chemistry, properties of porous media, solutions to hydraulic flow problems, analytical and digital models, and hydrogeologic interpretation. Prerequisite: mathematics through calculus and MATH225, GEOL309, GEOL314 or GEOL315, and GEGN351, or MEGN351 or consent of instructor. For GE Majors only. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEGN468. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND GEOTECHNICS. 4.0 Hours.

(I) Application of geology to evaluation of construction, mining, and environmental projects such as dams, water ways, tunnels, highways, bridges, buildings, mine design, and land-based waste disposal facilities. Design projects including field, laboratory, and computer analysis are an important part of the course. Prerequisite: MNGN321 and CEEN312/CEEN312L or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 semester hours.

GEGN469. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(II) (WI) This is a capstone design course that emphasizes realistic engineering geologic/geotechnics projects. Lecture time is used to introduce projects and discussions of methods and procedures for project work. Several major projects will be assigned and one to two field trips will be required. Students work as individual investigators and in teams. Final written design reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequisite: GEGN468 or equivalent and EPIC264. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN470. GROUND-WATER ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3.0 Hours.

(II) (WI) Application of the principles of hydrogeology and ground-water engineering to water supply, geotechnical, or water quality problems involving the design of well fields, drilling programs, and/or pump tests. Engineering reports, complete with specifications, analysis, and results, will be required. Prerequisite: GEGN467 or equivalent or consent of instructor and EPIC264. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN473. GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SITE INVESTIGATION. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Methods of field investigation, testing, and monitoring for geotechnical and hazardous waste sites, including: drilling and sampling methods, sample logging, field testing methods, instrumentation, trench logging, foundation inspection, engineering stratigraphic column and engineering soils map construction. Projects will include technical writing for investigations (reports, memos, proposals, workplans). Class will culminate in practice conducting simulated investigations (using a computer simulator). 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEGN475. APPLICATIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their applications to all areas of geology and geological engineering. Lecture topics include: principles of GIS, data structures, digital elevation models, data input and verification, data analysis and spatial modeling, data quality and error propagation, methods of GIS projects, as well as video presentations. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEGN481. ADVANCED HYDROGEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions concerning the theory, measurement, and estimation of ground water parameters, fractured-rock flow, new or specialized methods of well hydraulics and pump tests, tracer methods, and well construction design. Design of well tests in variety of settings. Prerequisites: GEGN467 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEGN483. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Lectures, assigned readings, and direct computer experience concerning the fundamentals and applications of analytical and finite-difference solutions to ground water flow problems as well as an introduction to inverse modeling. Design of computer models to solve ground water problems. Prerequisites: Familiarity with computers, mathematics through differential and integral calculus, and GEGN467. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEGN497. SUMMER PROGRAMS. 15.0 Hours.

GEGN498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

GEGN499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OR ENGINEERING HYDROGEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

GEOC407. ATMOSPHERE, WEATHER AND CLIMATE. 3.0 Hours.

(II) An introduction to the Earth?s atmosphere and its role in weather patterns and long term climate. Provides basic understanding of origin and evolution of the atmosphere, Earth?s heat budget, global atmospheric circulation and modern climatic zones. Long- and short-term climate change including paleoclimatology, the causes of glacial periods and global warming, and the depletion of the ozone layer. Causes and effects of volcanic eruptions on climate, El Nino, acid rain, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and avalanches are also discussed. Microclimates and weather patterns common in Colorado. Prerequisite: Completion of CSM freshman technical core, or equivalent. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.

GEOC408. INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) An introduction to the scientific study of the oceans, including chemistry, physics, geology, biology, geophysics, and mineral resources of the marine environment. Lectures from pertinent disciplines are included. Recommended background: basic college courses in chemistry, geology, mathematics, and physics. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours. Offered alternate years.

GEOL102. INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1.0 Hour.

(II) Presentations by faculty members and outside professionals of case studies to provide a comprehensive overview of the fields of Geology and Geological Engineering and the preparation necessary to pursue careers in those fields. A short paper on an academic professional path will be required. Prerequisite: GEGN101 or concurrent enrollment. 1 hour lecture; 1 semester hour.

GEOL198. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

GEOL199. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

GEOL299. INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1-6 Hour.

GEOL308. INTRODUCTORY APPLIED STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Nature and origin of structural features of Earth?s crust emphasizing structural controls on oil and gas entrapment. Structural patterns and associations are discussed in context of plate tectonic theories, using examples from across the globe. In class exercises and field projects in structural geometry, mapping and cross section construction and seismic reflection data interpretation. Course required of all PEGN and GPGN students. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEOL309. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY AND TECTONICS. 4.0 Hours.

(I) (WI) Recognition, habitat, and origin of deformational structures related to stresses and strains (rock mechanics and microstructures) and plate tectonics. Structural development of mountain belts, rift, strike-slip and salt systems. Comprehensive field and laboratory projects use descriptive geometry, stereographic projection, structural contours, map and cross section construction, air photo interpretation, and seismic reflection data analysis. Required of Geological Engineers. Prerequisite: GEGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205 and GEGN206 or GPGN200. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEOL310. EARTH MATERIALS AND RESOURCES. 4.0 Hours.

(I) Introduction to Earth Materials, emphasizing the structure, formation, distribution and engineering behavior of minerals, rocks and ores. Laboratories emphasize the recognition, description and engineering evaluation of natural materials. Lectures present the knowledge of natural materials, processes and resources necessary for mining engineering careers. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 4 semester hours.

GEOL311. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY FOR MINING ENGINEERS. 2.0 Hours.

(II) Nature and origin of structural features of Earth's crust emphasizing structural controls of ore deposits and analysis of structures related to rock engineering and mining. Structural features and processes are related to stress/strain theory and rock mechanics principles. Lab and field projects include deformation experiments, geologic map, cross section, and orientation data analysis of structural features including fractures, faults, folds, and rock cleavages. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 2 semester hours combined lecture and lab.

GEOL314. STRATIGRAPHY. 4.0 Hours.

(II) Lectures and laboratory and field exercises in concepts of stratigraphy and biostratigraphy, facies associations in various depositional environments, sedimentary rock sequences and geometries in sedimentary basins, and geohistory analysis of sedimentary basins. Prerequisite: GEGN101, GEGN203, GEGN204, GEGN205. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 4 semester hours.

GEOL315. SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Integrated lecture, laboratory and field exercises on the genesis of sedimentary rocks as related to subsurface porosity and permeability development and distribution for non-geology majors. Emphasis is placed on siliciclastic systems of varying degrees of heterogeneity. Topics include diagenesis, facies analysis, correlation techniques, and sequence and seismic stratigraphy. Application to hydrocarbon exploitation stressed throughout the course. Required of all PEGN students. Prerequisite: GEGN101, PEGN308, or consent of instructor. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; 3 semester hours.

GEOL321. MINERALOGY AND MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION. 3.0 Hours.

(I) Principles of mineralogy and mineral characterization. Crystallography of naturally occurring materials. Principles of crystal chemistry. Interrelationships among mineral structure, external shape, chemical composition, and physical properties. Introduction to mineral stability. Laboratories emphasize analytical methods, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. Prerequisite: GEGN101, CHGN122, GEGN206. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab: 3 semester hours.

GEOL399. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

GEOL410. PLANETARY GEOLOGY. 2.0 Hours.

(II) Geology of the terrestrial planets and moons, specifically the Moon and Mars. Emphasis will be placed on the geomorphology, planetary materials, geologic structure, geologic history, and natural resource potential of terrestrial planetary bodies. Lectures present the knowledge of materials, geomorphic processes, and geologic history. Prerequisite: GEGN101. 2 hours lecture: 2 semester hours.

GEOL443. UNDERGRADUATE FIELD SEMINAR. 1-3 Hour.

Special advanced classroom and field programs emphasizing detailed study of some aspects of the geology of an area or region. Field studies normally conducted away from the Golden campus. Classroom course content dependent on area of study. Consent of instructor and/or Department Head required. Fees assessed for field and living expenses and transportation. 1 to 3 semester hours; may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

GEOL470. APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING. 3.0 Hours.

(II) Students are introduced to geoscience applications of satellite remote sensing. Introductory lectures provide background on satellites, sensors, methodology, and diverse applications. One or more areas of application are presented from a systems perspective. Guest lecturers from academia, industry, and government agencies present case studies focusing on applications, which vary from semester to semester. Students do independent term projects, under the supervision of a faculty member or guest lecturer, that are presented both written and orally at the end of the term. Prerequisites: PHGN200 and MATH225 or consent of instructor. 3 hours lecture; 3 semester hours.

GEOL497. SPECIAL SUMMER COURSE. 15.0 Hours.

GEOL498. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY OR GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Pilot course or special topics course. Topics chosen from special interests of instructor(s) and student(s). Usually the course is offered only once. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit under different titles.

GEOL499. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOLOGY. 1-6 Hour.

(I, II) Individual research or special problem projects supervised by a faculty member, also, when a student and instructor agree on a subject matter, content, and credit hours. Prerequisite: ?Independent Study? form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar. Variable credit; 1 to 6 credit hours. Repeatable for credit.

Professor and Department Head

Paul M. Santi

Professors

Wendy J. Harrison

Murray W. Hitzman, Charles F. Fogarty Professor of Economic Geology

Reed M. Maxwell

Stephen A. Sonnenberg, Charles Boettcher Distinguished Chair in Petroleum Geology

Richard F. Wendlandt

Associate Professors

David A. Benson

Jerry D. Higgins

John D. Humphrey

Thomas Monecke

Piret Plink-Bjorklund

Kamini Singha, Joint appointment with Civil and Environmental Engineering

Bruce Trudgill

Wei Zhou

Assistant Professors

Alexander Gysi

Nigel Kelly

Yvette Kuiper

Alexis Sitchler

Teaching Professor

Christian V. Shorey

Teaching Assistant Professor

Elizabeth Holley

Distinguished Scientist

Charles F. Kluth

Research Professors

David Pyles

J. Fredrick Sarg

Research Associate Professors

Donna S. Anderson

Mason Dykstra

Nicholas B. Harris

Research Assistant Professors

Jennifer L. Aschoff

Jeremy Boak

Maeve Boland

Mary Carr

Brian Ebel

Karin Hoal

Professors Emerita

Eileen Poeter

Professors Emeriti

John B. Curtis

Thomas L.T. Grose

John D. Haun

Neil F. Hurley

Keenan Lee

Samuel B. Romberger

A. Keith Turner

John E. Warme

Robert J. Weimer

Associate Professors Emeriti

L. Graham Closs

Timothy A. Cross

Gregory S. Holden

Joint Appointment

Stephen M. Enders

John E. McCray